Ten Days of Raising a Life-Long Learner: Day 9

10 days of Raising a Life-Long Learner

Tweens & Teens:
Pursuing Passions!

“They know enough who know how to learn.”
The Education of Henry Adams p. 314

BJ was a quiet kid – like his dad. He enjoyed playing the piano and messing around with his friends. There was one thing that really got him excited, though, and that was computers. As soon as he finished his studies each day, he would spend whatever time he could on the computer. His mom got him books on programming and he pored over them. What he read, he put into action on their Mac. Over the years, his interest grew. He really wasn’t sure he was interested in going to college; he really was sure he was interested in computers!

His parents took the money they had saved up for his college education and bought him a state-of-the-art computer, printer, and many peripherals. He had learned so much about computers and programming over the years, they believed he would learn what he needed to know to be a valuable employee or entrepreneur if just given exposure to the right equipment.

Right about this time, BJ began volunteering in the TV studio at their church. He started out sweeping the floors and emptying waste cans. Just by being there, he was learning much. Folks began to notice that he had an incredible amount of interest and aptitude in the use of computers in television and movie production and was even able to help them through various difficulties which arose. Soon a paying position opened up; BJ applied for and got the job.

Then the homeschool graduate was making good money doing what he loved. Now, years later, his reputation in his city for being the fellow who ‘knows how to handle problems’ that arise in computer and film production is well established. BJ is in demand for this type of consulting and is happily doing his life’s work.

 Experience is the Best Teacher…

…. so the saying goes. Many young people are taking advantage of the enormous opportunities available to them as home educated students. The flexible schedules they usually possess, as well as the ability to take the time to really focus on an area of interest, are of great value.

However, these opportunities don’t usually just jump into your lap. It takes an alert, caring adult to:

  • search out possibilities
  • turn occurrences into opportunities
  • encourage the student to participate.

There are adults who would be pleased and honored to share their vocation with an interested young person.
Do your student a favor – help him/her find one!

<"Maggie;

Be sure to visit these brilliant women during our
10 Day of Adventure between November 7th-18th!
I love these ladies and I know you will too.

10 days of Character Studies | Confessions of a Homeschooler
10 days of Christmas Countdown Ideas | Milk & Cookies
10 days of Creative Writing | Chocolate on My Cranium
10 days of Crockpot Meals | The Happy Housewife
10 Days to a Godly Marriage | Women Living Well
10 Days of Growing Leaders | Mom’s Mustard Seeds
10 Days of Homeschooling High School | Weird Unsocialized Homeschoolers
10 days of I Wish I Had Known | Fruit in Season
10 days of Keeping Your Marbles | The Tie That Binds Us
10 days of Kid-friendly Food | Planner Perfect
10 Days of Language Arts Lesson Planning | Jimmie’s Collage
10 Days of Apps | Daze of Adventure
10 Days of a Mason Jar Christmas | Cajun Joie de Vivre
10 Days of More JESUS in Christmas | Preschoolers and Peace
10 Days to a Peaceful Home | Raising Arrows
10 Days of Raising a Life-Long-Learner | Bright Ideas Press
10 days of Science with Math | Blog, She Wrote
10 days of Teaching Values | Our Journey Westward
10 days of Winning your Child’s Heart | I Take Joy

This post may contain affiliate links. For more information, please refer to the disclosure policy

Ten Days of Raising a Life-Long Learner: Day 8

10 days of Raising a Life-Long LearnerLife-Long Learners: Tweens to Teens

Hobbies to Apprenticeships to Careers

Does your young person have a pastime, a hobby, a consuming interest? Hobbies often lead to life-long interests, college degrees, or career choices. Tweens and teens who are encouraged to pursue their passions tend to be more focused on what they want to accomplish with their lives.

When time is built into the homeschool for serious hobbies,
the stage is set for life-long learning.

  • Those with artistic natures who have ample time to immerse themselves will improve their talent—whether it’s their writing, art, or music, etc.
  • Those who have an academic passion will find they have more time to read, work on the computer, and follow their interests to a deeper level.
  • Students who are planning a vocational or technical career may begin an apprenticeship in their chosen field.

With the proper guidance from their parents, these young people will enter adulthood poised, confident, and with a solid academic and work ethic background. Responsible and independent problem-solvers are always gladly welcomed into colleges and the work place!

Keys to Raising a Life-Long Learner

Support them and provide numerous occasions to practice:

  • study skills
  • time management skills
  • life skills
  • rebounding (from failure) skills
  • hard work and perseverance

Spend time in the Word yourself and live out the practical applications of your faith.
At no other age is the
“Do as I say, not as I do” adage less likely to work!

 Real Life Story #1 Lauren and Flossie the Cow

“Is it my imagination, or is Flossie standing exactly where and how she was last night?” Janice asked her family aloud. Her eleven-year-old daughter, Lauren, assured her that it was not her imagination and that she had been trying to tell her mom that Flossie looked sick.

Their two acres out in the country—filled with a variety of animals—was exactly to this middle child’s liking. She willingly worked hard on the property and had earned the title, “Farm Manager.”

They called the vet who came out and examined the pregnant cow, Flossie. It was a good thing they called her because it turned out that Flossie was in pretty bad shape.

Thus began their relationship with a large animal vet. Being the child who always loved animals, Lauren was extremely interested in all the procedures the doctor performed on her many visits.

Lauren was so very interested in learning more about how people help sick animals that eventually the vet was asked if Lauren could accompany her on her rounds one day. The answer was positive, and sure enough, the day came when Lauren was invited to go along. She loved it and went again and again. Lauren treasured those experiences and longed for more.

Janice, Lauren, and the doctor talked and came up with the following arrangement: Lauren would accompany the vet once a week in exchange for doing weekly chores at the vet’s office. The following year was a very happy one for the young farm manager.

She was essentially functioning as a nurse-assistant. Her expertise grew to where she could anticipate what tool was needed during surgery and she was invited to tag along whenever there was something interesting happening. She even looked forward to performing the mundane work on her volunteer evening. Sometimes she washed the trucks, sometimes she did paper work, sometimes she filled pill bottles, sometimes she cleaned the office. No matter, Lauren worked hard and enthusiastically.

During the year this shy middle child grew into a self-confident, knowledgeable young lady. The following year it became apparent to the veterinarian that her business had grown to the point where she needed to hire part-time help. To whom do you suppose she offered the position? Lauren was excited! It not only was her first paying job, it was a job at which she was skilled and one she dearly loved.

When it came time to figure out her high school science requirements, it was easy assigning her credit for the many hours of labor and incredible knowledge she had gained. Nine years later Lauren earned an RN degree from Johns Hopkins University!

In my next blog post I’ll share Real Life Story # 2:
Ben’s Computer and Video Adventures 

<"Maggie

Be sure to visit these brilliant women during our
10 Day of Adventure between November 7th-18th!
I love these ladies and I know you will too.

10 days of Character Studies | Confessions of a Homeschooler
10 days of Christmas Countdown Ideas | Milk & Cookies
10 days of Creative Writing | Chocolate on My Cranium
10 days of Crockpot Meals | The Happy Housewife
10 Days to a Godly Marriage | Women Living Well
10 Days of Growing Leaders | Mom’s Mustard Seeds
10 Days of Homeschooling High School | Weird Unsocialized Homeschoolers
10 days of I Wish I Had Known | Fruit in Season
10 days of Keeping Your Marbles | The Tie That Binds Us
10 days of Kid-friendly Food | Planner Perfect
10 Days of Language Arts Lesson Planning | Jimmie’s Collage
10 Days of Apps | Daze of Adventure
10 Days of a Mason Jar Christmas | Cajun Joie de Vivre
10 Days of More JESUS in Christmas | Preschoolers and Peace
10 Days to a Peaceful Home | Raising Arrows
10 Days of Raising a Life-Long-Learner | Bright Ideas Press
10 days of Science with Math | Blog, She Wrote
10 days of Teaching Values | Our Journey Westward
10 days of Winning your Child’s Heart | I Take Joy

This post may contain affiliate links. For more information, please refer to the disclosure policy

Ten Days of Raising a Life-Long Learner: Day 7 — Baby Steps

10 days of Raising a Life-Long Learner

Baby Steps

Kaylee: Determined Doer

 

Avalon: Patient Watcher

Meet my granddaughters. The cutie on the left is Avalon—at this writing she is 9 months old. (Picture is at 6 months.) The spitfire on the right is Kaylee, pictured here on her second birthday. (She is now 2 1/2.) The joy of having them close by and raised by Godly parents is more than I can express! It’s also been quite a learning experience for me. Seeing them through the lens of time and experience is very different from when I was in the “parenting a toddler” era. They are also prime fodder for this column :-)

Take Avi, She is a watcher. She watches and watches and watches. She doesn’t miss a minute. She is quiet and reflective and willing to try new things but she operates in a world of gentle pacing. She is learning to walk but doesn’t get all stressed out and crazy when she falls or can’t get up. She is capable of many things but is also content if Grandmom wants to give her something or do something for her.

Now take Kaylee, she is a doer. As in I WILL DO IT MYSELF, ALL BY MYSELF, AND LEAVE ME ALONE I AM BUSY DOING IT. Whatever “it” is – Kaylee is absolutely positively convinced that she, and only she, can do it. She tries and tries again until she “gets it right.” Put shoes on the correct feet? Done. Dribble a full sized basketball with Granddad? Just about. From the very beginning, she has wanted as little assistance as possible and is offended if you try to help without her asking for it. She is non-stop run, play, and figure everything out kind of a kid.

Which of these two personalities strikes you as the best candidate for being a life-long learner? The correct answer? BOTH of them are. Why? Even though they were born with very different personalities and traits, they both have parents equally aware of their needs and of God’s Word. Parents who will work WITH their personalities to guide them into adulthood and who will encourage them in the process of being Life Long Learners.

Have you watched a baby learning to walk? Some get up, fall down, try again. Some get up fall down, cry, try again. Some just get up and fall down and get up and fall down over and over again. It’s fun watching the process and seeing how different each child reacts to failure (falling) and how much perseverance a particular child exhibits. Some just seem determined from the beginning and no amount of falling down will change their perseverance. Others appear to give up more easily. Yet others have their efforts helped (or hurt) by too much or not enough parental intervention.

What Type of Parent are You?
Do you jump in and help that baby, toddler, teen accomplish their goals:

  • Before they fall?
  • While they are falling?
  • After they have fallen?
  • Do you provide an environment that allows for growth, trial & error, even failure, in a safe place?
  • Does your “baby” give up easily because mom or dad will quickly come to the rescue?
  • Does your “baby” become exasperated because you almost never come to the rescue?

It’s a fine line, isn’t it?

We want our kids to succeed at their challenges, their goals. We want to protect them from pain (physical, mental, emotional) along the way. But we also want them to become life-long learners & problem solvers, which includes learning some things the hard way.

It is so important to know your child’s temperament.

What one child needs and can deal with in terms of hands-off would absolutely crush a different child. Some need much more direction in learning perseverance, others need more in the way of limits! Know your child. Read your Bible daily, and commit this to prayer:

Lord, please give me wisdom in training _______ in perseverance so that he/she will grow into a person who has Godly character. Help me to know when to help and when to back off; when to offer advice, when to keep silent; when to encourage, when to admonish. Please Father, give me insight into their needs and personality so that I can be wise in their upbringing.

There is no definitive answer for how often or quickly a parent should come to the rescue.
But the Bible offers general principles. Regardless of whether you intervene quickly, or not at all, one vital component toward raising Life Long Learners is training your children to stay on task in order to complete their goals. This is one of the most valuable gifts you can provide. Parents, don’t forget that you need to persevere so that your children finish well! Here are some verses to read, chew on, and from which to seek wisdom.

All Scripture taken from the New King James Version (NKJV).

Proverbs 24:16
For a righteous man may fall seven times
And rise again,
But the wicked shall fall by calamity.

Romans 5:3-4
And not only that, but we also glory in tribulations, knowing that tribulation produces perseverance; and perseverance, character; and character, hope.

2 Peter 1:5-7
But also for this very reason, giving all diligence, add to your faith virtue, to virtue knowledge, to knowledge self-control, to self-control perseverance, to perseverance godliness, to godliness brotherly kindness, and to brotherly kindness love.

2 Chronicles 15:7
But you, be strong and do not let your hands be weak, for your work shall be rewarded!

Tomorrow: Tweens and Teens

<"Maggie
Be sure to visit these brilliant women during our
10 Day of Adventure between November 7th-18th!
I love these ladies and I know you will too.

10 days of Character Studies | Confessions of a Homeschooler
10 days of Christmas Countdown Ideas | Milk & Cookies
10 days of Creative Writing | Chocolate on My Cranium
10 days of Crockpot Meals | The Happy Housewife
10 Days to a Godly Marriage | Women Living Well
10 Days of Growing Leaders | Mom’s Mustard Seeds
10 Days of Homeschooling High School | Weird Unsocialized Homeschoolers
10 days of I Wish I Had Known | Fruit in Season
10 days of Keeping Your Marbles | The Tie That Binds Us
10 days of Kid-friendly Food | Planner Perfect
10 Days of Language Arts Lesson Planning | Jimmie’s Collage
10 Days of Apps | Daze of Adventure
10 Days of a Mason Jar Christmas | Cajun Joie de Vivre
10 Days of More JESUS in Christmas | Preschoolers and Peace
10 Days to a Peaceful Home | Raising Arrows
10 Days of Raising a Life-Long-Learner | Bright Ideas Press
10 days of Science with Math | Blog, She Wrote
10 days of Teaching Values | Our Journey Westward
10 days of Winning your Child’s Heart | I Take Joy

This post may contain affiliate links. For more information, please refer to the disclosure policy

Ten Days of Raising a Life-Long Learner: Day 6 — Research Ninja Skills, Part 3

10 days of Raising a Life-Long Learner

Ninja Research Skills (Part 3)

Absolutely Indispensable Reference Helps

Yesterday, we talked about sources for finding out pretty much anything and how to discern which sources are reliable.  Today, let’s discuss specific books and sites.

Bibles

I highly recommend owning several versions besides your family’s preferred translation.

  • One of my favorite websites is www.Biblegateway.com  which has easy-to-look-up versions in a myriad of translations and nice on-line commentaries too, including Matthew Henry’s.

Dictionaries

Sigh, so many dictionaries to love and so little time to read them…

Thesauri

NOTE: The one in your word processor DOES NOT count.
The paperback that has words just arranged alphabetically isn’t much better.

  • Do yourself a huge favor and spend under 20.00 for the best, most useful thesaurus ever invented: Roget’s International Thesaurus. Spend an hour to learn to use it and you will wonder how you ever wrote without it. All high school students should be well acquainted with this book!
  • Younger students would be best served to start with a simpler thesaurus like the Scholastic Student Thesaurus by John Bollard

Almanacs

Do you know what amazing information a good almanac contains?
Optional, but every home library would benefit from a recent almanac.

[Warning: sadly, many student almanac’s contain pop culture so
please look through yours carefully before handing it off to a child.]

Quotations

A book of quotations is best arranged topically in order to
find just the right quote. These are great for history papers,
storytelling, inspiration, and enlivening dinner conversation!

Favorite Writing Reference Books

  • I don’t know what I’d do without the Chicago Manual of Style. Be sure to get the latest (16th) version which includes: how to treat punctuation, names, numbers, tables, quotations, dialogue, abbreviations, etc. PLUS must-know guidelines for web writing and references. This book (or website subscription) is a MUST for the serious high school or college student.
  • For simpler needs, another go-to resource is the Big Blue Book of Grammar and Punctuation. There is an online option for it, as well.

Well, I ran out of time before I got to atlases (possibly my most favorite reference material of all. Or maybe not. So hard to have a favorite child!) but that’s how I roll. So, here’s hoping you stop back for Day 6:

A Close Look at Atlases:
Ninja Skills for Finding Your Way!

<"Maggie

Be sure to visit these brilliant women during our
10 Day of Adventure between November 7th-18th!
I love these ladies and I know you will, too.

10 days of Character Studies | Confessions of a Homeschooler
10 days of Christmas Countdown Ideas | Milk & Cookies
10 days of Creative Writing | Chocolate on My Cranium
10 days of Crockpot Meals | The Happy Housewife
10 Days to a Godly Marriage | Women Living Well
10 Days of Growing Leaders | Mom’s Mustard Seeds
10 Days of Homeschooling High School | Weird Unsocialized Homeschoolers
10 days of I Wish I Had Known | Fruit in Season
10 days of Keeping Your Marbles | The Tie That Binds Us
10 days of Kid-friendly Food | Planner Perfect
10 Days of Language Arts Lesson Planning | Jimmie’s Collage
10 Days of Apps | Daze of Adventure
10 Days of a Mason Jar Christmas | Cajun Joie de Vivre
10 Days of More JESUS in Christmas | Preschoolers and Peace
10 Days to a Peaceful Home | Raising Arrows
10 Days of Raising a Life-Long-Learner | Bright Ideas Press
10 days of Science with Math | Blog, She Wrote
10 days of Teaching Values | Our Journey Westward
10 days of Winning your Child’s Heart | I Take Joy

This post may contain affiliate links. For more information, please refer to the disclosure policy

Ten Days of Raising a Life-Long Learner: Day 5 — Research Ninja Skills, Part 2

10 days of Raising a Life-Long Learner

Ninja Research Skills (Part 2)

Guest post by Tyler Hogan (Maggie’s son)

Read Part 1

When researching, how do you know if the information is credible? Choose and analyze sources properly. Different sources have different uses.
Here is the Ninja Quick Guide to choosing the right sources.

Magazines

Magazines often contain good information about current events. That said, be careful about your choice of magazine. Tabloids like the ones in grocery stores are not reliable sources.(Shocking, I know!) Choose more credible magazines like World or Time for research.

Make a distinction between an article describing what is currently happening and an article providing someone’s opinion of what is happening. Typically, when a TV or movie personality writes about political events, the article is that person’s opinion—not a reliable source of information.

Magazines are useful for pop culture trends. If you are doing a paper on popular diets, for example, magazines are generally full of the latest ones. Look through issues of the same magazine from a previous decade and see how things change (or don’t)!

The purpose of some magazines such as Popular Mechanics or Popular Science is to make somewhat more scholarly information easily accessible to the general public. These can be good sources, but keep in mind that they are not as heavily researched or scrutinized as Journals.

Journals

Academic journals are typically very reliable sources of information because they are written by scholars, reviewed and edited by scholars, and read by scholars. When researching, they can be a good source of information. The down side, however, is that they can be difficult to understand unless you already know something about the topic. Journal articles typically have a good bibliography, which is useful for finding other sources. Peruse them also just to discover what has been researched on the topic already.

Newspapers

Newspapers are good sources of information for local, national, and international events. They’re also useful for finding opinions (both popular and expert) and commentaries on various subjects. Look at the editorials pages(s).

Books

Books are a vital part of research. In a good book, one should find accurate, detailed information on a topic. The quality of the book is the key factor. There are many things look at to determine a book’s reliability.

1.   Check the author’s credentials. Does he/she have a degree? If so, what level (Bachelors, masters, doctorate, etc.)? What is his experience with the topic? If a person does not have a degree, but has a lot of personal experience with the topic, he is usually qualified to write on it.

2.   Check the preface and look at the back to see who endorsed the book. Are these people good sources with either degrees or wide experience in the field?

3.   Check the author’s bibliography to see if he had good sources for his own research. Did he use good first-hand sources or only second hand sources? You can also track down the author’s research to do your own.

4.   Check for biases when dealing with controversial topics. A book on the Vietnam War written by a pacifist will likely record information differently then one written by a veteran.

5. Look at the copyright date and at the publisher for clues as to quality and accuracy.

Encyclopedias

Encyclopedias are typically a reliable source of information. Most only find a broad overview of any given topic but these concise explanations can provide good background research for your topic. They may point to main ideas and concepts worthy of additional research.

The Catalog and Periodical Index

Each library will have a catalog – detailing what resources the library owns and where to find them. Many libraries also have a periodical index, which help locate articles in magazines, journals, and newspapers kept on file.

The Internet

The internet is a fast source of information – when using reliable sites. Keep in mind that anyone can post something and call it “fact.” There are several ways of being able to tell if a source is reliable.

1.   Who sponsors the website? Is it an official institution or credible individual?

2.   Does the information have an author listed? If not, don’t use it unless it is backed by a legitimate institution. If the author is named, look him up. Check to see if he is credible to speak to the topic. Credibility is usually based on education. If he has a PHD in his field, he should be reliable. If he has a Masters or a Bachelors degree he may also be a reliable source. Don’t cite someone who writes about the topic as a hobby. Credibility can also be based on a person’s experience in the field. If you are doing a paper on Islam, for example, a person who is (or was) a Muslim would be a credible source (regardless of education).

3.   Look for a bibliography of sources the author used—it will show he did research.

4.   Again, check for biases when dealing with controversial topics.

Correspondence

Often, a person’s letters and other documents are kept on file. C. S. Lewis, for instance, had a large record of letters which can be cited as primary source material. Your own personal correspondence with a witness or expert (either through e-mail, snail mail, or interview) is also fantastic source.

2 Rules of Thumb

1. Try to use first-hand rather than second-hand sources. First-hand sources can be hard to find or non-existent. But if you are doing a research paper on the philosophy of Plato, for example, try to quote Plato more often than you quote commentaries about him.

2. When doing scientific or archeological research, be wary of outdated sources. New discoveries in these fields are made constantly. Although you can still quote old books in order to show what was believed, you will want more up to date material to show what is now believed to be fact. An encyclopedia published in 1966 is not a reliable source for research on the atom.

Do you have a favorite research source? Please share!

In our next post we’ll dig into resources from
Atlases to Quotations
 in our quest for
Ninja Research Skills in: Raising a Life-Long Learner.

<"Maggie
Please be sure to visit these brilliant women during the
HOTM’s “10 Days of …” adventures between November 7th-18th!

10 days of Character Studies | Confessions of a Homeschooler
10 days of Christmas Countdown Ideas | Milk & Cookies
10 days of Creative Writing | Chocolate on My Cranium
10 days of Crockpot Meals | The Happy Housewife
10 Days to a Godly Marriage | Women Living Well
10 Days of Growing Leaders | Mom’s Mustard Seeds
10 Days of Homeschooling High School | Weird Unsocialized Homeschoolers
10 days of I Wish I Had Known | Fruit in Season
10 days of Keeping Your Marbles | The Tie That Binds Us
10 days of Kid-friendly Food | Planner Perfect
10 Days of Language Arts Lesson Planning | Jimmie’s Collage
10 Days of Apps | Daze of Adventure
10 Days of a Mason Jar Christmas | Cajun Joie de Vivre
10 Days of More JESUS in Christmas | Preschoolers and Peace
10 Days to a Peaceful Home | Raising Arrows
10 Days of Raising a Life-Long-Learner | Bright Ideas Press
10 days of Science with Math | Blog, She Wrote
10 days of Teaching Values | Our Journey Westward
10 days of Winning your Child’s Heart | I Take Joy

This post may contain affiliate links. For more information, please refer to the disclosure policy

Ten Days of Raising a Life-Long Learner: Day 4 — Research Ninja Skills, Part 1

10 days of Raising a Life-Long Learner

Ninja Research Skills

People!! Are there more important life/work/college/school skills than knowing how and where to find information?! (Well, ok, maybe there are… but not many.) My goal in homeschooling was not to try and teach my sons everything but rather to Teach Them How to Learn – so they could find what they needed to know.

To that end: in the next few posts I’ll share my favorite sites for finding what you need to know. (And, knowing how to determine if a site is a trustworthy source!)

Simple List Time. Bookmark these. Trust me.
(Even if your kid-lets are little, you will want these yourself
and they will need them in a few years.)

On the web you will find many “OWLS” (Online Writing Labs). My absolute favorite is the one hosted by Purdue University. They state:
“The Online Writing Lab (OWL) at Purdue University houses writing resources and instructional material, and we provide these as a free service of the Writing Lab at Purdue. Students, members of the community, and users worldwide will find information to assist with many writing projects.”

  • www.aresearchguide.com/
    “The goal of this web site is to provide all the necessary tools for students to conduct research and to present their findings…provides a Quick Click to Search Engines, annotated Research, Writing, and Style Guides (MLA, APA, Chicago, etc.), housing some of the best education sites in a Virtual Library arranged by the Dewey Decimal Classification System.”

The site also provides guidelines on:

  1. How to write an A+ research paper.
  2. How to effectively deliver a presentation.
  3. How to format a research or term paper.
  4. How to quote passages.
  5. How not to plagiarize.
  6. How to write Footnotes and Endnotes with examples pages.
  • www.writinghelp-central.com/
    There are many free and valuable examples on this site (do be aware there are also lots of opportunities to buy his ebooks). I especially like his section on writing different types of letters.
  •  https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/
    The CIA World Factbook is one of my all time favorite and most oft-used sites. Although this site is not especially intuitive, if you poke around you can find pretty much you’d ever need to know about any given country. It provides “…information on the history, people, government, economy, geography, communications, transportation, and military for 267 world entities.”

Tomorrow we’ll start Digging for Golden Sources
in our quest to develop Ninja research skills in Raising a Life-Long Learner, Part 5.

<"Maggie
Be sure to visit these brilliant women during our
10 Day of Adventure between November 7th-18th!
I love these ladies and I know you will too.

10 days of Character Studies | Confessions of a Homeschooler
10 days of Christmas Countdown Ideas | Milk & Cookies
10 days of Creative Writing | Chocolate on My Cranium
10 days of Crockpot Meals | The Happy Housewife
10 Days to a Godly Marriage | Women Living Well
10 Days of Growing Leaders | Mom’s Mustard Seeds
10 Days of Homeschooling High School | Weird Unsocialized Homeschoolers
10 days of I Wish I Had Known | Fruit in Season
10 days of Keeping Your Marbles | The Tie That Binds Us
10 days of Kid-friendly Food | Planner Perfect
10 Days of Language Arts Lesson Planning | Jimmie’s Collage
10 Days of Apps | Daze of Adventure
10 Days of a Mason Jar Christmas | Cajun Joie de Vivre
10 Days of More JESUS in Christmas | Preschoolers and Peace
10 Days to a Peaceful Home | Raising Arrows
10 Days of Raising a Life-Long-Learner | Bright Ideas Press
10 days of Science with Math | Blog, She Wrote
10 days of Teaching Values | Our Journey Westward
10 days of Winning your Child’s Heart | I Take Joy

This post may contain affiliate links. For more information, please refer to the disclosure policy